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The Story Of Moses

  • 2000


This is an engaging and graceful book that relates the familiar story of Moses in a new and thought-provoking way according to Islamic traditional sources. It is interesting both because it provides an unusual perspective on an old tale but also because it provides a rare insight into true Islamic and Sufi thinking. It is beautifully designed and enhanced with over 50 original and colorful paintings. This is what others had to say about it: 
"In a world in which resentment and hostility have replaced tolerance and understanding - this lovely book speaks from the heart of traditional Islam about the spiritual lessons to be drawn from the story of the prophet Moses who unites us all." - Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan 
"A truly beautiful book, well presented with seemingly simple yet illuminating illustrations! I was so immersed in it that it was difficult to put down until the end! Lessons learnt from these stories retold encourage readers to reflect on our own life journeys in our quest to reach the Divine Presence. Indeed a must-read!" - HH Raja Eleena binti Sultan Azlan Shah of Perak, Malaysia 
"As one of the great scholars of Islam said, "The Wisdom of Moses is manifold". And, indeed, the story of this Prophet has accompanied mankind in so many different ways and was told with so many intentions. He is mostly remembered for speaking with God and for bringing his people into the presence of the Divine. But his story was not only told to remember the joy of being close to God, but also, and especially in recent times, to convey the unwillingness to accept this closeness. This book tells the story, not as someone wants it to be, but as it was given by the Divine Storyteller Himself. Not as an expression of my or your preferences, but as an invitation to reflect and as a means to "make firm your heart". Because that is most needed. And that is most excellently accomplished through "The Story of Moses" you have before you, because its intention is not to impose but to serve." - Steffen A.J. Stelzer, Chair of the Department of Philosophy, The American University in Cairo